We Review: Blade Runner 2049 “Well done. Highly recommended.” – MR

Blade Runner 2049

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blade Runner 2049
Blade Runner 2049 poster.png

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Denis Villeneuve
Produced by
Screenplay by
Story by Hampton Fancher
Based on Characters from Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
byPhilip K. Dick
Starring
Music by
Cinematography Roger Deakins
Edited by Joe Walker
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
  • October 3, 2017(Dolby Theatre)
  • October 6, 2017(United States)
Running time
163 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $150–185 million[3][4][5][6]
Box office $158 million[6]

Blade Runner 2049 is a 2017 American neo-noirscience fiction film directed by Denis Villeneuve and written by Hampton Fancher and Michael Green.[7] A sequel to the 1982 film Blade Runner, the film stars Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford, with Ana de ArmasSylvia HoeksRobin WrightMackenzie DavisCarla JuriLennie JamesDave Bautista and Jared Leto in supporting roles. Set thirty years after the original film, the story depicts a bioengineered human named K, who discovers the remains of a once-pregnant replicant. To prevent a possible war between replicants and humans, K is secretly tasked with finding the child and destroying all evidence related to it.

Principal photography took place in Budapest, Hungary between July and November 2016. Blade Runner 2049premiered in Los Angeles on October 3, 2017 and was released in the United States on October 6, 2017, in 2D, 3D and IMAX. The film received acclaim from critics, with some regarding it as one of the best sequels ever made, and has grossed $158 million worldwide.[8][9][10][11]

Plot

In 2049, bioengineered humans called replicants have been integrated into society as servants and slaves. K, a newer replicant model created to obey, works as a “blade runner” for the LAPD, hunting down and “retiring” rogue older model replicants. His home life is spent with his holographic girlfriend Joi, an artificial intelligenceproduct of Wallace Corporation.

K’s investigation into a growing replicant freedom movement leads him to a farm, where he retires rogue replicant Sapper Morton and finds a buried box. A forensic analysis reveals the box contains the remains of a female replicant who died as the result of complications from an emergency caesarean section. K finds this unsettling as pregnancy in replicants was originally thought to be impossible.

K is ordered to destroy all evidence related to the case and to retire the child by his superior, Lieutenant Joshi, who believes the knowledge that replicants are able to reproduce to be dangerous and could lead to war. K, disturbed by his orders to kill a born individual, visits the headquarters of Wallace Corporation founder Niander Wallace, who identifies the body as Rachael, an experimental replicant. In the process, he learns of her romantic ties with former veteran blade runner Rick Deckard. Believing that reproduction in replicants can expand his off-world operations, but lacking this technology himself, Wallace sends his replicant enforcer Luv to steal Rachael’s remains from LAPD headquarters and follow K to find Rachael’s child.

Returning to Morton’s farm to destroy it, K finds a hidden date that matches one of his own childhood memories about hiding a toy horse. Joi insists that this coincidence is evidence that K is, in fact, a real person. While searching birth records for that year, he discovers that twins were born on that day with identical DNA except for the sex chromosome; only the boy is listed as alive. Tracking the child to an orphanage in ruined San Diego, K discovers its records from the relevant year have been stolen. K also recognises the orphanage from his memories, and finds the hidden toy horse, suggesting that these memories — which he thought were merely implants — are real.

K seeks out Dr. Ana Stelline, a memory designer who informs him that it is illegal to program replicants with humans’ real memories, leading K to believe he might be Rachael’s son. After failing a test of his replicant behavior, K is suspended by Joshi, but he explains that he failed the test because he completed his mission in killing the child. Joshi gives him 48 hours to disappear. K transfers Joi to a mobile emitter despite knowing that if it is damaged she will be erased. Undeterred, K has the toy horse analyzed and finds traces of radiation that lead him to the ruins of Las Vegas, where he finds Deckard. Deckard reveals that he scrambled the birth records to cover his tracks and was forced to leave a pregnant Rachael with the replicant freedom movement to protect her.

Luv and her men murder Joshi, track K’s location and arrive to kidnap Deckard.

Our Thoughts

Having watched the original a few hours before BR2049, things were fresh in my mind. I liked the new film for several reasons, one of them is they didn’t venture too far from the original storyline, even though a lot of time had passed and the technology has evolved. The new Blade Runners are replicants, though, which was sort of disappointing.  The plot is semi-confusing, if you are not into sci-fi, but as things come together toward the end, it all becomes clearer. The end, is left open for another installment, and by the amount of money this film has made there will definitely be a part three to the franchise.  All in all, I give this one 5 stars. The acting is superb, the effects well done, and I highly recommend seeing this one in a premium seating or IMAX environment. – MR

Find Blade Runner 2049 and see the new trailer here.

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About twittersfantasyebookguide

We watch and review fantasy and Sci-Fi movies. (Both new releases and classics via - Amazon Streaming) We also tweet about fantasy genre news from across the blogosphere. Follow us @WizardWyrm on twitter. View all posts by twittersfantasyebookguide

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