Tag Archives: movies

We Review: The Hitman’s Bodyguard “A laugh out loud, bullet ridden thrill ride.” -MR

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Hitman’s Bodyguard
HitmansBodyguard.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Patrick Hughes
Produced by
  • David Ellison
  • Mark Gill
  • Dana Goldberg
  • Matthew O’Toole
  • John Thompson
  • Les Weldon
Written by Tom O’Connor
Starring
Music by Atli Örvarsson
Cinematography Jules O’Loughlin
Edited by Jake Roberts
Production
company
Distributed by Lionsgate Films[1]
Release date
  • August 18, 2017
Running time
118 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $30 million[3]

The Hitman’s Bodyguard is a 2017 American actioncomedy film directed by Patrick Hughes and written by Tom O’Connor, whose script was on the 2011 Black List. The film stars Ryan ReynoldsSamuel L. JacksonGary Oldman and Salma Hayek, and follows a bodyguard who is hired to protect a hitman who has to testify at the International Court of Justice.

The Hitman’s Bodyguard was released in the United States on August 18, 2017 and received mixed reviews from critics, who praised Reynolds and Jackson’s chemistry but criticized the clichéd plot and execution.[4]

Plot

Bodyguard Michael Bryce (Ryan Reynolds) is hired to protect a Japanese arms dealer. All apparently goes well, but the dealer is shot in the head at the last minute. Two years later, Bryce has fallen into disgrace and ekes out a living protecting drug-addicted corporate executives. Meanwhile, Vladislav Dukhovich (Gary Oldman), the ruthless and bloodthirsty dictator of Belarus, is put on trial for crimes against humanity at the International Court of Justice. The prosecution is unable to make headway against him, as they cannot substantiate their allegations with physical evidence and Dukhovich assassinates any witnesses who could do so. The prosecution’s last hope is notorious hitman Darius Kincaid (Samuel L. Jackson), who agrees to testify against Dukhovich in exchange for the exoneration of his wife Sonia (Salma Hayek), who is currently incarcerated.[5]

Interpol Assistant Director Jean Foucher (Joaquim de Almeida) assigns Amelia Roussel (Élodie Yung), a greenhorn agent who is Bryce’s estranged ex-girlfriend, to lead a squad of Interpol agents tasked with escorting Kincaid to The Hague to testify. However, the convoy is ambushed and everyone except Kincaid and Roussel is killed. The two retreat to a safehouse, where they deduce someone in Interpol must have betrayed them to Dukhovich. Realizing that they need someone who is completely unaffiliated with Interpol and can remain trustworthy, Roussel contacts Bryce. Bryce is reluctant to help, as he has had multiple conflicts with Kincaid in the past and believes that Roussel was responsible for the death of his client two years ago, but ultimately agrees to aid them in exchange for the restoration of his good name. Roussel returns to Interpol to update them on the situation while Bryce and Kincaid escape an attack by Dukhovich’s men.

Foucher approaches Dukhovich, revealing himself to be the traitor, and demands his payment for selling out Kincaid; Dukhovich stabs him in the hand and informs him he will only be paid when Kincaid is dead. Dukhovich’s men track Kincaid’s location through his cellphone and ambush him and Bryce. While they are able to fight them off, their vehicle is destroyed. The two hitchhike to a ferry terminal and take a ferry to Amsterdam, where Sonia is being held. Kincaid escapes from Bryce to send flowers to Sonia, and Bryce tracks him down and kills several more hitmen. Kincaid reveals that he chanced upon the arms dealer during an unrelated contract and killed him in order to collect the bounty on his head. Enraged, Bryce abandons him.

As Bryce bemoans his failures, an army of hitmen attack. Bryce changes his mind and helps Kincaid escape, but is captured.

Cast

Our Thoughts

This is a high-octane, bullet-ridden thrill ride. I laughed so hard at one scene my drink came up through my nose. The character interaction is great, and there is edge-of-your-seat violence from start to finish. As far as action thrillers go, this is top notch, and it is as funny as most modern comedies. There is even a dual romance element, that isn’t as cheesy as you would think. I have to give it 5 stars and it is definitely worth the cost of a premium ticket. A laugh out loud, bullet ridden thrill ride. Highly Recommended -MR

 

Find The Hitman’s Bodyguard and see the new trailer here.

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We Review: Arrival “Nothing new, but still entertaining 3.5 stars” – MR

Arrival

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Arrival
Arrival, Movie Poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Denis Villeneuve
Produced by
Screenplay by Eric Heisserer
Based on Story of Your Life
by Ted Chiang
Starring
Music by Jóhann Jóhannsson
Cinematography Bradford Young
Edited by Joe Walker
Production
companies
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
(North America)[1]
Sony Pictures(International)[2]
Release dates
  • September 1, 2016(Venice)
  • November 11, 2016(United States)
Running time
116 minutes[3]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $47 million[4][5]
Box office $39.2 million[5]

Arrival is a 2016 American hard science fiction thriller film directed by Denis Villeneuve and written by Eric Heisserer, based on the short storyStory of Your Life” by author Ted Chiang. The film stars Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, Forest Whitaker, Michael Stuhlbarg and Tzi Ma.[6]

Arrival had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival on September 1, 2016, and was released in the United States on November 11, 2016, in IMAX by Paramount Pictures. The film received positive reviews, and praise for its story, sustained intense and suspenseful atmosphere, and Amy Adams’s performance. It has grossed $39 million.

Plot

Twelve mysterious extraterrestrial spacecraft, nicknamed “shells” by the U.S. military, appear across the Earth. It is unclear why they have arrived or whether there is any logic behind their choice of sites. Linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) is selected to join a special team created to analyse the alien species at the US site in Montana, due to her skills in translation and her existing high level security clearance. Also on the team are theoretical physicist Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner), and a US Army Colonel named Weber (Forest Whitaker). The story opens with a sequence of Louise with her daughter, who dies of a rare type of cancer while still young.

The team makes ‘first contact’ with two cephalopod-like aliens, which they call ‘Heptapods’ because they have seven ‘arms’. Ian nicknames them Abbott and Costello.

Louise decides that two-way communication in the aliens’ spoken language would be impossible. However, she discovers that they can communicate using their written language, which is based upon complicated circular symbols with inter-related components. With Ian’s help she begins to learn the symbols that correspond to a basic English vocabulary, hoping to build understanding so that she can eventually ask why the aliens have come to Earth. As Louise begins to become more proficient with the alien language, she starts to see images of herself with her daughter, both whilst communicating and later, as dreams.

The potential ambiguity in translation becomes a serious issue when the aliens communicate symbols that translate as “offer weapon”, with similar translations (for example “use weapon”) being deduced at other sites. As other nations, which had initially all been sharing their data and analysis, translate their versions of the message, they close down communication with each other. Some start to scramble their military, believing the message to indicate a threat. Louise believes that, due to the difficulty of translating the language’s complex structure, the “weapon” element of the symbol might have an alternative meaning, such as “tool”.

Rogue soldiers take matters into their own hands and plant a timed C4 explosive device within the shell. Louise and Ian are unaware of the device and go back into the shell, to communicate with Abbott and Costello again. Costello guides Louise to write one of their symbols on the barrier, and then both Abbott and Costello fill the screen with hundreds of smaller symbols. The device continues to count down as the rogue soldiers engage in a firefight with troops from the command centre. Costello leaves just before the device explodes but Abbott stays behind long enough to push Louise and Ian out of the communication chamber. They wake up in the base camp with concussion as the shell rises higher into the sky, out of reach.

Ian analyzes the pattern of symbols that the aliens had displayed to establish that it relates to the concept of time, and that what they received was one twelfth of an intended whole.

Meanwhile China makes preparations to attack their shell, and some other international forces do the same.

Cast

Our Thoughts

The concept and first part of this movie were fresh and spot on, but it turned into the same lost child/lost parent psychological drama that “First Contact” was. Amy Adams looks so much like Nicole Kidman, I thought it was Nicole until my date told me it wasn’t. That is a compliment to Amy’s acting. All of the actors did a great job, the story just ended up being the same ole, same ole. The movie was intriguing to me, and it taught me about some linguistics theory I would have never know had I not seen this film. However, it is what it is, a newer version of “First Contact,” differing enough that they don’t seem like the same thing. Nothing new, but still entertaining. 3.5 stars – MR