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We Review: Jack Reacher: Never Go Back “4.1 stars 100% as expected. No Surprises, but still entertaining” – MR

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jack Reacher: Never Go Back
Jack Reacher Never Go Back poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Edward Zwick
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on Never Go Back
by Lee Child
Starring
Music by Henry Jackman
Cinematography Oliver Wood
Edited by Billy Weber
Production
companies
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release dates
  • October 16, 2016(New Orleans)
  • October 21, 2016(United States)
Running time
118 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $60 million[2][3]
Box office $60.2 million[2]

Jack Reacher: Never Go Back is a 2016 American actionthriller film directed by Edward Zwick and written by Zwick, Richard Wenk and Marshall Herskovitz. A sequel to 2012 film Jack Reacher, the film stars Tom Cruise, Cobie Smulders, Patrick Heusinger, Aldis Hodge, Danika Yarosh and Holt McCallany. The plot follows Reacher going on-the-run with an Army Major who has been wrongly framed for espionage.

Principal photography began on October 20, 2015 in New Orleans and the film was released on October 21, 2016 in IMAX[4] and conventional formats. It received mixed reviews and has grossed $60 million.

Plot

After dismantling a human trafficking ring, former military investigator turned vigilante drifter Jack Reacher returns to his old military headquarters to meet Major Susan Turner, who has been assisting him in his investigations, only to learn from his old rival, Colonel Sam Morgan, that Turner has been accused of espionage and detained.

Turner’s attorney, Colonel Bob Moorcroft, reveals that there is evidence that Turner is involved in the murders of two soldiers in Afghanistan, but Reacher believes she is being framed. Moorcroft also reveals an old acquaintance of Reacher’s, Candice Dayton, has filed a paternity suit against him, claiming he’s the biological father of her 15-year-old daughter, Samantha Dayton. Moorcroft is later killed by an assassin known as “The Hunter”.

Reacher reaches out to Samantha, but she rebuffs him, believing he’s after her biological mother due to her past as a drug addict. Reacher is later framed for Moorcroft’s murder and detained alongside Turner. Assassins arrive to kill them, but Reacher neutralizes them, rescues Turner and they escape to Morgan’s house, having deduced he’s involved in the conspiracy, to extract information. After they leave, the Hunter kills Morgan and frames Reacher.

Reacher and Turner uncover surveillance pictures of Samantha and surmise she’s in danger, arriving at her home to find her foster parents dead and a Samantha hiding in the kitchen. Upon learning from a friend, Sergeant Leach, that he’s also been framed for Morgan’s death, Reacher decides to escort Samantha to a private school for protection, but discover that she has her mobile phone with her and the enemy probably knows exactly where they are. They discard the phone and make a quick exit, during which Samantha steals a backpack from one of the students to use the credit cards.

Reacher, Turner and Samantha travel to New Orleans in search of Daniel Prudhomme, the only eyewitness to the murders that Turner has been framed for. They find him in a derelict warehouse filled with drug addicts and learn that Prudhomme is connected to Parasource, a private military organization that is trying to cover up the murders. Reacher contacts Turner’s friend, Captain Anthony Espin, to move Prudhomme into custody, but they are ambushed by assassins and Prudhomme is killed, while Reacher rescues Espin and finds out that the assassins are Parasource contractors. Parasource’s CEO, General James Harkness, then sends his enforcer, the Hunter, to capture Samantha after she uses a credit card to order room service.

Reacher and Turner, along with Espin, acting on information provided by Prudhomme, intercept a flight of weapons due to leave the country, where they confront Harkness and his men and accuse them of corruption. Upon opening the crates, however, Espin find weapons as declared in the flight manifest. Before Turner can be re-arrested, Reacher opens up one of the weapons crates and discovers that they are filled with opium. They learn that Harkness framed Turner, who had been investigating his activities, for the murders of two soldiers who discovered that Harkness was selling weapons to insurgents and smuggling drugs into the United States. Espin and his men then arrest Harkness, clearing Reacher’s and Turner’s names.

The Hunter and his men locate and chase Samantha through the streets to lure Reacher into a confrontation. Turner kills one of the assassins, whilst Reacher takes out another one on the rooftop. The Hunter captures Samantha and threatens to kill her, but she manages to escape and steal his gun. Reacher then tackles the Hunter and they have a vicious fight that culminates with Reacher breaking the Hunter’s neck. Reacher then admits to Samantha he might be her father.

Following Harkness’ arrest, Turner is reinstated in her old position and goes back to her office, where her collegues and Captain Espin all welcome her back. Reacher promises to keep in touch before meeting Samantha at a diner to meet Candice, whom he surmises he will recognize as he remembers everyone he has slept with. Samantha reveals that the waitress that had been serving him is in fact Candice and that Reacher can’t be her father as they didn’t recognize each other. Reacher and Samantha then reluctantly part.

While preparing to leave, a phone rings in Reacher’s pocket and finds Samantha’s phone, which she had slipped on his pocket, with a final goodbye. Reacher smiles as he hitches a ride to the nearest town.

Cast

Our Thoughts

Was it good? Yes.

Did I like it? Yes.

Is it as good as the first Reacher movie? No

Will I go see a third Reacher flick? Absolutely

BUT, I still found myself a little dissapointed. The acting and characters are superb, it was just too predictable. 4.1 stars 100% as expected. No Surprises, but still entertaining. – MR

 

Find  Jack Reacher: Never Go Back and see the new trailer here.

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The Deed of Paksenarrion – Reviewed “Long, slow, but if you stick with it, a very rewarding epic masterpiece.” – M.R.

From Wiki:

The Deed of Paksenarrion is an epic fantasy saga by the American author Elizabeth Moon. The Deed of Paksenarrion was originally published in three volumes in 1988 and 1989 and as a single trade edition of that name in 1992 by Baen. The three books included are Sheepfarmer’s Daughter, Divided Allegiance and Oath of Gold. Sheepfarmer’s Daughter was awarded the Compton Crook Award by the Baltimore Science Fiction Society for the author’s first fantasy novel.

A single volume prequel about the life of Paksenarrion’s guiding saint was published in 1990, and followed by a sequel tying characters from both works together.

Our Thoughts:  I read this in jail of all places. The full “three-book-in-one” volume we had was held together with rubber-bands. All of the pages were there, though, save for one corner of page 735.  I remember the soldiering scenes from these stories. Paksenarrion spent long trudging months training to be the warrior depicted on the cover, or did she?  She is one tough woman, and I tell you what. She has inspired many a fantasy female character.  (Zena, Sheena, maybe even Brienne of Tarth? I think very much so on the latter. )

Props to Elizabeth Moon. When in an open jail tank (with 30-some-odd people running around) if I could read my way out of the moment, the author was one I considered great. Moon did that. I can still remember the dark elf scenes and the wild way the story twists, toward the end, even now.

4  stars – Highly Recommended.  –  M.R.

Sadly you cannot find The Deed of Paksenarrion for Kindle or Nook.

Please visit this Amazon page    In the box under the cover image click that you would like to see this novel for Kindle.


“Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn” – Tad Williams Fantasy Trilogy reviewed.

From Wiki:
Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn is Tad Williams’s epic fantasy trilogy, comprising The Dragonbone Chair (1988), Stone of Farewell (1990), and To Green Angel Tower (1993). The world and story draw upon many sources from history and folklore. Several characters’ elements and experiences mirror the legends of Great Britain and other lands (e.g., King Arthur and Sir Lancelot, Alfred the Great, Baba Yaga, and Amaterasu). The dominant Erkynlanders resemble the medieval English, with Anglo-Saxon/Biblical-sounding personal names in addition to the usual castle-based feudal/agrarian setting of stock fantasy. The other peoples of Osten Ard also have identifiable real-world parallels in their names, cultures, and native tongues.

Our Thoughts: I read this trilogy some years ago and three scenes stick out in my head. Simon facing the dragon in the snow. Tad William’s description of the dragon’s approach was so well written that I stopped and reflected on it. Also the flooded plains frozen over. Loved some of the battle strategies portrayed there. The Sithi city in the forest, with the strung up cloth art and vividly different culture. I enjoyed these books a lot. My ONLY gripe about this trilogy is that it is 4 books long. Book III – To Green Angel Tower was so big that the publishers split the paperback in two. Having to buy the 4th book was irksome. Luckily, these days we have ereaders and the title fits in a single file just fine.

The Sithi (which are pre-Sith) are like elves. The other creatures from Tad’s imagination are something else all together, and much terrible fun.

This is a 4 star epic fantasy that I highly recommend. – M.R.

Find Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn on   Kindle   Nook


I want to announce 4 giveaways that pertain to The Wardstone Trilogy

I want to announce 4 giveaways that pertain to The Wardstone Trilogy. Winners for all 3 will be decided Independence Day, July 4th 2012. ALL entries are FREE.

These giveaways are taking place to promote the
July 4th 2012 release of The Wizard and the Warlord – The Wardstone Trilogy Book III by M. R. Mathias

Five Chapter Preview in .pdf  HERE

#1 is the Fantasy Book Critic Indie Kindy   Win a Kindle Fire or a Kindle Touch loaded with indie fantasy eBooks.
info: Fantasy Book Critic

#2 is a Goodreads Giveaway of 5 signed copies of The Sword and the Dragon – The Wardstone Trilogy Book I
info: Goodreads Giveaway

#3 is a Goodreads Giveaway of a signed copy of  Kings, Queens, Heroes, and Fools – The Wardstone Trilogy Book II
info: Goodreads Giveaway

#4 is a Goodreads Giveaway of a signed copy of The Butcher’s Boy – 2011 Readers favorite Award Winner for Horror Fiction

info: Goodreads Giveaway

Please pass these on to your friends and followers.  Thank you. @WizardWyrm


We Review: Lord Foul’s Bane (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant One)

Lord Foul’s Bane by Stephen R. Donaldson

The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever
Lord Foul’s Bane (1977)
The Illearth War (1978)
The Power that Preserves (1979)

The most unlikely of heroes stars in this epic masterpiece. An author, who is also a leper from modern 70s earth, is summoned to a fantasy world by Drool Rockworm who weilds the Staff of Law. Drool tells him he must go on a quest to see the Council of Lords at Revelstone, so that they can make preparations to combat Lord Foul.

Thomas starts off by raping a girl who thinks he is an old hero reincarnated, Berek Halfhand. In his defense Thomas thought he was in a dream, and still really in the “Real World.” The quest is fantastical, meeting giants, Salt Heart Foam Follower, a favorite charachter of mine, as well as a few other interesting creations.

Thomas then goes into Mount Thunder, with Lord Prothall, and his sleepless, ageless protectors, the Bloodguard, in an attempt to wrestle the Staff of Law away from Lord Foul and his minions.

I recomend this book to people who are really into fantasy. This is no Harry Potter/Hunger Games types of story. And not nearly as political as Game of Thrones. Great writing and a solid (eventually 9 book long )  story await you. 4 stars recomended.

Find it on: Kindle or NOOK or Smashwords (currently not available)